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Boston Legal Season 1 Ep 17

Episode Summary Death Be Not Proud / Season 1, Episode 17 First Broadcast: March 20, 2005; Replay: September 6, 2005 Chelina asks Alan to help her in Texas because her former client is executed but may be innocent of the crime. An old friend of Denny and Shirley`s asks her for legal representation when she is accused of having sex for a fee. Lori files a complaint with Shirley and Paul about Denny and they seriously consider doing something about it. Especially if they suspect he committed an unethical act in his latest case. Credits of the episode directed by . Matt Shakman Written by . David E. Kelley and Jonathan Shapiro Sterling K. Brown.

Zeke Born` trotter burns. Supervisor Silverman John Considine . Judge Lance Abrams Liam Craig . Lawyer Gerald Litman James Dalesandro . Judge Theodore Mitchell Henry Gibson . Judge Clark Brown Shelley Long . Miriam Watson William Murray . Companion Conor O`Farrell . A.D.A. Glenn Jackson Kat Sawyer-Young . Judge Martha Brenford Donovan Scott . Judge Christopher Serra Ken Strunk .

Father Thomas Martin Kerry Washington . Chelina Hall Chelina asks Alan to help her in Texas because her former client is executed but could be innocent of the crime. An old friend of Denny and Shirley`s asks her for legal representation when she is accused of having sex for a fee. Lori files a complaint with Shirley and Paul about Denny and they seriously consider doing something about it. Especially if they suspect he committed an unethical act in his latest case. Episode Reviews> Into The Next Life by Abney [written for TV Tome] Wow. I mean, wow. Probably the strongest episode of the series, dramatically spoken.

Of the few episodes of The Practice I saw before Alan Shore`s launch in Season 8, it seemed true as an episode that could have come from this series, with a classic Boston Legal subplot to undermine the seriousness of the main plot, which was simply phenomenal. Alan is so effective in this role – because for once he`s not sardonic or complacent. He`s excited about a deal he really believes in, and he doesn`t have the upper hand – he`s fighting an uphill and tough battle that he knows he probably can`t win. But he fought anyway. For Chelina, for Zeke – for her own personal beliefs. This is admirable, whether you are morally upright or not. I won`t say whether the death penalty is virtuous or a monstrous institution, and I won`t even address the fact that Texas is responsible for so many death sentences imposed by our country`s state. David E. Kelley has done a lot for both of us.

Instead, I want to look at the people who make up this series – it`s the characters who carry us through the story on a case-by-case basis. That`s why I watch the show in the first place, and that`s why I stick to it. I`m telling you, pure and simple, right now – Alan Shore is THE most interesting, engaging, sarcastic and at the same time absolutely serious character on television. Period. I couldn`t help but look with admiration as he delivered his final speech to the Texas judges and struggled to find a way to support Zeke`s execution in every way possible. He loves people like Chelina who ask him for help in this insurmountable situation, and he hates that he sometimes fails. But that`s what makes it more real than the (pleasantly) one-dimensional Denny. Whoever entered the Boston office of Crane, Poole, Schmidt from day one was rude, rude, inappropriate, rude, rude, vulgar. They understand the situation.

Tara doesn`t seem to care, and while Sally struggled with this stuff from time to time, it wasn`t really a problem for her. But Lori isn`t like her, and she can`t look any further when he makes his classic comments. Of course, they win lawsuits, as well as corruption and intimidation by judges, but perhaps Lori`s formal complaint will be the trigger for a power struggle within the office that could tear apart our already troubled lawyers, who for the most part can`t stand each other`s society, even more than they are now. And I`m in favor of any kind of overlapping story. The other story, about a nymphomaniac (are you serious!?), was not suitable and suited to Zeke`s case. It`s twice in a row, that two cases that don`t go together at all were forced together in one episode. In fact, I think this episode would have been much better with a one-case schedule for once. Humor served to break the tension, but it also trivialized it and did not do it justice at all. (Very intentional pun intended.) At the end of the day, everyone who heard Zeke`s story judged him. Not only those who condemned him or did not prevent his execution may have been illegal, but also our legal heroes, Alan and Chelina. Chelina was so willing to believe he was innocent that she had destroyed any foray into the Texas legal system and made a case impossible to win even less winnable before she even called Alan. However, it is not that she is to blame; She didn`t feel like she, Zeke or her case were being treated the way they deserved, and it was an injustice that Alan testified.

However, it is not difficult to see both sides of the story. I sympathize with Zeke and Chelina`s trick, but I`m not a Texan, and I`m not going to criticize the way they do things in Texas, no matter how suspicious their system may seem. That`s not my place. However, it is Alan`s. And Chelina`s. Last week, Alan was the defender of free speech. This week, he represented not only a mentally disabled client, but also his own type of justice. He didn`t come to his case with money – greed is not a factor for him, although money is certainly something nice to have. He didn`t need to come to Texas with Chelina to carry out this case, but he`s not as hardened and heartless as he comes out of the initial introduction.

He is not infallible and he does not always win. But he`s still a damn good lawyer. Perhaps Zeke`s confession was forced. Maybe he was brainwashed – Chelina even went so far as to suggest it, perhaps out of desperation. They interrogated him for an incredible 16 hours. Keep in mind that this is a man with reduced mental capacity, and it probably wasn`t that hard to convince him that he did what they wanted him to do. He may not remember it, but on the other hand, all you need is to have a doctor in front of you, convincingly explaining that your mind often darkens traumatic events. Zeke was bent to the will of others, made flexible, his fighting spirit killed. Believes that his salvation was to accept his own death for a crime he is not even sure he committed. Alan was able to awaken in him this very human desire to find humanity in Zeke.